Conceptual Differences in how to organize Anglo-Tejanx differences

Tejanxs have always been perceived as a distinct outgroup in Texas. But the question is how these differences were organized in rhetoric and law — the logic they obeyed, the axes of difference they marked out. The ingrouping-outgrouping could be done along a variety of distinct axes of difference — differences in religion, of color, of ethne, of nationality, of class, of race, of sides in wartime, etc.

 

If one wishes to do so, it is not at all difficult to prove that Anglo-Texans often entertained very low opinions of Texas Mexicans in the antebellum period

If one wishes to do so, it is not at all difficult to prove that Anglo-Texans often entertained very low opinions of Texas Mexicans in the antebellum period, and that they often organized these derogatory opinions under an ugly set of ethnic stereotypes and racial comparisons.[1] And yet as Anglo-Texans enjoyed steadily increasing dominance over lawmaking and politics, and immersed themselves in reconstructing the Texas polity in ever-more race-conscious terms … [legal culture and hard cases]Indeed perhaps part of the lesson of this study is the loose joint between commonplace race culture and officially recognized racial discourse.

 

 

  1. [1]De León, They Called Them Greasers.